Compromise

Last week i did a post on following the crowd and in that post i mentioned i will be doing a follow up post on how compromise almost took the life of king Jehoshaphat. Today we will be looking into the life of this great man of God.

To get a clearer understanding of this post, i will encourage you to read 2 Chronicles 18, 20:31-37. I will be pulling out certain verses from these chapters for us to focus on. But before i do that, let me give you a quick overview of who this man was.

Jehoshaphat was the king of Judah and a bold follower of God. He carried out a national programme on religious education. He called the people to prayer. He was a committed and devoted man. He had many military victories. He seemed like the right guy for the job. He was a man who loved God, loved the people, and knew how to do his job well. So where did he go wrong?

Compromise in marital relationship

Despite his strengths, he compromised by arranging for his son to marry Athaliah, the daughter of wicked king Ahab.

Jehoshaphat enjoyed great riches and high esteem, and he made an alliance with Ahab of Israel by having his son marry Ahab’s daughter. 2 Chronicles 8:1

Marriage doesn’t only bring two people together, it also brings two families together. What does a family where holiness and righteousness is treasured have to do with a family where idolatry is reverend? I have had many young people ask me if it’s OK to marry someone who is good but not really into faith. And i always ask them why they are feeling the need to compromise with something that should be their anchor. Our faith is where our story begins. It is our foundation. The topic of faith when it comes to marriage shouldn’t be an area where compromise is even considered.

Can two walk together, unless they are agreed? Amos 3:3

Do not be yoked together with unbelievers. For what do righteousness and wickedness have in common? Or what fellowship can light have with darkness? 2 Corinthians 6:14

This blend of family exposed Jehoshaphat to a circle he shouldn’t be in and the result of this leads to my next point.

Compromise in social relationships

A few years later he went to Samaria to visit Ahab, who prepared a great banquet for him and his officials. They butchered great numbers of sheep, goats, and cattle for the feast. Then Ahab enticed Jehoshaphat to join forces with him to recover Ramoth-gilead. 2 Chronicles 18:2

Marrying from the family of Ahab brought him into a relationship which exposed him to temptations. James 1:14 says temptation comes from our own desires. As Jehoshaphat got comfortable at dinner, Ahab pitched his product. He enticed Jehoshaphat to join forces with him. Pay attention to the word ‘enticed’. Watch what you do when your belly is full. Watch what you do when you are comfortable.

Jehoshaphat made an alliance with Ahab the wicked king. Ahab was an opportunist who wanted to capitalize on Jehoshaphat’s popularity and power. This alliance had 3 consequences.

  • Jehoshaphat incurred God’s anger (2 Chronicles 19:2)
  • When Jehoshaphat’s grandson died, Athaliah his daughter in law seized the throne and almost destroyed all of David’s descendants (22:10-12)
  • Athaliah brought the evil practices of Israel into Judah, which eventually led to the nation’s downfall.

When believers form close alliance and relationships with unbelievers, values can be compromised and spiritual awareness dulled.

When asked to join forces, Jehoshaphat agreed to the deal before saying he will go ask God. He has already committed to this with his words. The bible warns against making promises we cannot keep. He preempted God by committing to something God never told him to commit to.

In what areas of our lives are we preempting God? Sometimes we make decisions on our own, and attach the name of Jesus Christ to them when Jesus had nothing to do with those choices. It looks good, doesn’t mean it is right. It is right doesn’t mean it is right for you. This is the reason why we always have to acknowledge Him in all our ways so He will direct our paths.

Jehoshaphat now in an awkward situation wants to go find out what God thinks about a decision he has already committed to with his words. Ahab brought his prophets, bringing Jehoshaphat into;

Compromise in spiritual relationship

These were not prophets of God. They were in Ahab’s team. Can you see how far this situation is going? Jehoshaphat now finds himself among 400 demonic prophets who told Ahab exactly what he wanted to hear. The people we are surrounded with are constantly speaking into our lives. If these people are not of God, their words will contaminate our spirit.

These demonic prophets all said it’s ok for the battle to go ahead.

So the king of Israel summoned the prophets, 400 of them, and asked them, “Should we go to war against Ramoth-gilead, or should I hold back?”

They all replied, “Yes, go right ahead! God will give the king victory.” verse 5

Jehoshaphat asked for another prophet and Micaiah gave a different prophecy which was opposite of what the 400 prophets said. But Jehoshaphat ignored it and still went ahead.

It does us no good to seek God’s advice if we ignore when it is given. Real love for God is not only shown when we ask Him for direction. It is also shown when we obey and follow His direction. 

In verses 31-33, Jehoshaphat narrowly escaped death. At this point, you would have thought he learnt his lesson. But no, because he went further to;

Compromise in business relationship

In 2 Chronicles 20:35-37, Jehoshaphat is seen forming another alliance with another wicked king. Ahab was killed in the previous battle. Now Jehoshaphat teamed up with King Ahaziah of Israel to build a fleet of trading ships. This never ended well because God destroyed it. When we stay in compromise, we become desensitized to sin. Jehoshaphat’s judgement is now blurred and he no longer sees any danger in forming alliances with wicked kings.

Some time later King Jehoshaphat of Judah made an alliance with King Ahaziah of Israel, who was very wicked. Together they built a fleet of trading ships at the port of Ezion-geber. Then Eliezer son of Dodavahu from Mareshah prophesied against Jehoshaphat. He said, “Because you have allied yourself with King Ahaziah, the Lord will destroy your work.” So the ships met with disaster and never put out to sea. (2 Chronicles 20:35-37)

To compromise is to accept standards that are lower than is desirable. Jehoshaphat met disaster when he joined forces with wicked king Ahaziah. This was because they were both on different wave current. The spirit of God and the spirit of the devil cannot work together. We court disaster when we enter into compromise with unbelievers because our foundations are different.

Think of areas where you are compromising. Pray and make a decision today to break those ties and decide to make better choices.

Similar post: Should a Christian establish a close relationship with a non-Christian?

37 thoughts on “Compromise

  1. FamMan8990

    Fantastic words! I had no plans of commenting or posting until the end of my hiatus Friday night, but my email randomly let see your whole blog from my inbox without having to log in. This message applies to my hiatus so much! God bless your words!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. My pleasure Sis! Only the beginning of what the Lord is doing in this season!! “Do not despise these small beginnings, for the Lord rejoices to see the work begin, to see the plumb line in Zerubbabel’s hand…Zechariah 4:10

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I can see it ministered to you in a great way. I wanted someone to feel what I felt when I studied for it. I was wrecked as a lot of things started coming to my mind and I saw areas where I still needed to surrender. I love your last sentence a lot. Knowing whose we are is key!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Fast forwarding, and speaking as a drama major … 😉 … Athaliah’s evil reign and downfall would make a great movie. Whenever I read the drama unfolding – the intrigue, the hiding of the one infant surviving her mass murder, his coronation a few years later, and her impromptu execution – I can picture the whole thing. Too bad Hollywood has never (as far as I know) done that story. It might make some people have second thoughts about their assumptions that the Bible is “BO-RING!” And it might open some blind eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Good morning, Efua!
    Thanks for the post!

    An observation:
    The LORD can use us in some relationship or situation to point His way and His Light to someone.
    That does not authorize us to compromise or submit ourselves to works contrary to His Truth and Justice.

    Blessings!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. Sure God can use us to shine light in darkness. That is what we have been called to do. However just as Jesus Christ who is our perfect example, didn’t have unbelievers in His inner circle of friends, I think we should emulate His style. We should interact with unbelievers but we shouldn’t put ourselves in situations where our faith will be compromised. Blessings Carlos!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: Vital~signs….. – New Life in Christ Jesus

  5. Great job breaking this down. I’m so glad God included examples in Scripture of good men who failed because of compromise. Such a good warning and example to us, and a comfort, in a way, that many Godly men were far from perfect. Our Christian lives are a work in progress.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The LORD does not err!
      And we know what people’s minds are like, and how Great Personages like David, and until even Solomon, made mistakes.

      So, in spite of my age, my faith and my search for the truth throughout my life;
      of so many falls along the way; so many mistakes;
      I have too scared to think I’m anything;
      and that I got somewhere safe…
      but I keep going… making my synthesis, diluting myself…

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Melina Johnson

    Such great piece of inspirational writing. You’ve covered the most important aspect of one’s life. Thanks
    May God continues to inspire you the more. 🙏

    Liked by 1 person

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